Weekly Game Review: “12 chairs”

Year: 2002
Genre: Quest, Adventure
Discs: 2 CD(*.iso)
Developer: Saturn+
Entertainer: Buka
Requirements: Windows 98/Me/2000/XP, Celeron 300, ram 32 mb, Cd-Rom 4-x, DirectX 8.0
Hints: The bottom line: “12 chairs” – another game, produced jointly by “Buck” and “Saturn +” continues a series of animated quests. The passage contains spoilers to some parts of the game, so if you arent familiar with the game or dont want to know what to expect, recommended. By 1989 Computer Gaming World reported that "the industry is moving toward heavy use of VGA graphics".[20] While some games were advertised with VGA support at the start of the year, they usually supported EGA graphics through VGA cards. There's been a much greater falling off of disk sales than anyone anticipated." A third attributed the end of growth in sales of the Commodore 64 to the console, and Trip Hawkins called Nintendo "the last hurrah of the 8-bit world". More than a third of games sold in North America were for the PC, twice as many as those for the Apple II and even outselling those for the Commodore 64. Players found modifying CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files for memory management cumbersome and confusing, and each game needed a different configuration. A Mindscape executive agreed, saying that "Unfortunately, its effect has been extremely negative. Without question, Nintendo's success has eroded software sales. The 1993 release of Doom on the PC was a breakthrough in 3D graphics, and was soon ported to various game consoles in a general shift toward greater realism. By 1989 Computer Gaming World reported that "the industry is moving toward heavy use of VGA graphics".[20] While some games were advertised with VGA support at the start of the year, they usually supported EGA graphics through VGA cards. Experts were unsure whether it affected 16-bit computer games,[17] but Hawkins in 1990 nonetheless had to deny rumors that Electronic Arts would withdraw from computers and only produce console games.[18] By 1993 ASCII Entertainment reported at a Software Publishing Association conference that the market for console games ($5.9 billion in revenue) was 12 times that of the computer-game market ($430 million). Their defining characteristics include a lack of any centralized controlling authority, a greater degree of user control over the video-gaming hardware and software used and a generally greater capacity in input, processing, and output.

Walkthrough:

This is a detective game in which you have a helper named Smart Alex. Using Smart Alex you can explore and analyze the items that were in your inventory, interact with different objects, turn on/off the flashlight, move to another location, get hints, and, in addition, to skip the puzzle. The game has a scoring system that determines what rank you get at the end of the game. The more points you earn, the higher the rating. Points are awarded for various actions, for example, collecting comic books, solving puzzles, etc. NOTE: At the simplest level of complexity you lose points for skipping puzzles and the use of Smart tips Alex. Also, you lose points for dying, regardless of difficulty level. Vorobyaninov decides to look for the treasure alone, but by chance he meets on his way tipster Ostap Bender. PC games, also known as computer games or personal computer games, are video games played on a personal computer rather than a dedicated video game console or arcade machine. To enhance the immersive experience with their unrealistic graphics and electronic sound, early PC games included extras such as the peril-sensitive sunglasses that shipped with The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy or the science fiction novella included with Elite. While many companies used the additional storage to release poor-quality shovelware collections of older software, or "enhanced" versions of existing ones,[28] new games such as Myst included many more assets for a richer game experience. Chris Crawford warned that it was "a data-intensive technology, not a process-intensive one", tempting developers to emphasize the quantity of digital assets like art and music over the quality of gameplay; Computer Gaming World wrote in 1993 that "publishers may be losing their focus". An early text-adventure, Adventure, was developed for the PDP-11 minicomputer by Will Crowther in 1976, and expanded by Don Woods in 1977.[4] By the 1980s, personal computers had become powerful enough to run games like Adventure, but by this time, graphics were beginning to become an important factor in games. While many companies used the additional storage to release poor-quality shovelware collections of older software, or "enhanced" versions of existing ones,[28] new games such as Myst included many more assets for a richer game experience. While many companies used the additional storage to release poor-quality shovelware collections of older software, or "enhanced" versions of existing ones,[28] new games such as Myst included many more assets for a richer game experience. Although personal computers only became popular with the development of the microprocessor and microcomputer, computer gaming on mainframes and minicomputers had previously already existed. These publications provided game code that could be typed into a computer and played, encouraging readers to submit their own software to competitions.[5] Microchess was one of the first games for microcomputers which was sold to the public. More than a third of games sold in North America were for the PC, twice as many as those for the Apple II and even outselling those for the Commodore 64.